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  1. #1
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    AAS Users and TRT/HRT Patients should be using these

    Nattokinase versus Serrapeptase
    World Nutrition, Inc. > Education > Nattokinase versus Serrapeptase
    JOLENE GORING

    Systemic Enzyme Therapy:
    Understanding the Differences between Serrapeptase and Nattokinase
    Systemic enzymes, used throughout Europe and Asia for decades, play an integral role in maintaining and supporting every function within the body. Enzymes are essential for sparking thousands of chemical reactions in the functions of growth, repair, reproduction, digestion, and metabolism system-wide. They also play a key role in regulating inflammation and fibrin in the body, signaling the body when to stop producing fibrin, as well as eliminating excess fibrin that has accumulated.

    The strength and concentration of our enzymes is directly related to how well our bodies fight disease and infection, repair injured tissues, and sustain the body’s multitude of functions including reproduction. Without an adequate supply of systemic enzymes, we can suffer from impairment in digestion, scar tissue/fibrin regulation, blood coagulation, reproduction, respiration, and the immune system.

    Without an adequate supply of systemic enzymes, we can suffer from impairment in digestion, scar tissue/fibrin regulation, blood coagulation, reproduction, respiration, and the immune system.

    Systemic enzymes are also known as proteolytic enzymes, which simply means that they “eat” or dissolve proteins in the body that do not serve a healthy purpose. Rogue proteins can be a result of an inflammatory process that has moved from being productive to unproductive, an auto-immune condition that is unregulated and causing damage to healthy tissues, and even the protein-rich outer coverings of a virus that allow it to attach to healthy tissues and replicate. Enzymes are an integral element in the healing processes and immune system function of the body.

    Generally speaking, the body has a sufficient supply of enzymes though the age of 27. Several modern-day influences – such as less-than ideal food and nutrition, toxic environments, chemicals, and stress – contribute to this decline. As our natural enzyme supply diminishes over time, we may notice that we take longer to heal and “bounce back” compared to when we were younger. Without enzymes, we are more susceptible to diseases, we age more quickly, and our bodies degenerate faster. Systemic Enzyme Therapy can stem this tide and help replace what has been lost due to age and other factors.

    Two primary systemic enzymes – serrapeptase and nattokinase – have been identified in the past several decades and they are proving to be very beneficial in combatting certain health conditions related to chronic inflammation. * While both have demonstrated to be the strongest and most fibrinolytic of their types, they have different but certain functions in the body.

    Serrapeptase

    Serrapeptase, also known as serratia peptidase; is a proteolytic enzyme isolated from the non-pathogenic enterobacteria Serratia E15. It was first discovered as the protease synthesized by the silkworm to dissolve its strong fibrin-rich cocoon before it emerges as a moth. Studies show that serrapeptase induces fibrinolytic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-edemic (preventing swelling and fluid retention) activity in a number of tissues.1,2 Its anti-inflammatory effects are widely believed superior to other proteolytic enzymes due to its ability to dissolve the fibrous and/or scar tissue related to the inflammation. Another primary benefit of serrapeptase is the reduction of pain attributed to the enzyme’s ability to block the release of pain-inducing amines from inflamed tissues. Physicians in Europe and Asia use serrapeptase as an alternative to aspirin, ibuprofen, and other NSAIDs.

    A primary role of systemic enzymes is to dissolve and digest non-living tissue – scars, excess fibrin, and adhesions. Due to its strength and its natural design for dissolving the fibrous tissue of the cocoon, serrapeptase has been very therapeutic in the treatment of fibroids, scar tissue, systemic inflammation, and related pain. Reducing inflammation and fibrin with a systemic enzyme formulated around the strength of serrapeptase, such as Vitšlzȳm™ Xe, may be a useful strategy for reducing pain by way of clearing inflammation and halting the inflammatory process. *

    Primary pathways of systemic enzyme therapy:



    4r

    Once the enzymes neutralize the proteins and remove the excess fibrin, the lymphatic and circulatory system can then eliminate them through normal detoxification processes. As excess unhealthy tissue is removed, proper blood flow is restored, promoting better circulation. After previous scar and other necrotic tissues have been eliminated, enzymes continue to keep the inflammatory response in balance so that further excess fibrin does not build up again.
    Systemic enzymes, like serrapeptase, may be a safe and alternative treatment to pain and inflammation as they target only the excess or damaging fibrin/scar tissue and help regulate normal, healthy fibrin levels that are necessary for healing and repair after surgery or an injury. Resolving issues of excess fibrin and scar tissue may have a tremendous impact on patient pain and discomfort related to women’s reproductive health, joint pain, gastrointestinal conditions, cardiovascular health, and any chronic condition related to inflammation.

    Nattokinase

    For decades, the medical community mostly agreed that an unhealthy cholesterol level was the primary cause of heart attacks. That is until autopsies confirmed that young victims of sudden heart attack did not have atherosclerotic plaque in their arteries. After much controversy and research, we now know that vascular inflammation in the arterial walls can close off blood vessels as tightly as the buildup of plaque itself.

    Inflammation in the cardiovascular system is no different than inflammation elsewhere in the body. As a response to trauma, injury, or repeated insult to the body, inflammation sets off a cascade of events that becomes the root cause of the components of cardiovascular disease. Without the proper mechanisms for managing chronic stress to the body and the inflammation that ensues, the body is vulnerable to uncontrolled inflammation and fibrosis which lead to plaque buildup and circulatory dysfunction.

    Nattokinase** is a profibrinolytic enzyme extracted and purified from the essence of natto, a fermented soybean food used by the Japanese for thousands of years as a traditional food medicine. Nattokinase was first identified in 1980 by Dr. Hiroyuki Sumi, M.D., Ph.D., who was researching thrombolytic enzymes to dissolve dangerous blood clots. After testing more than 200 natural foods as potential thrombolytic agents, Sumi found that natto possessed a substance with “a potency matched by no other enzyme.” Dr. Sumi named the newly discovered enzyme nattokinase.Natto also contains large amounts of vitamin K2, as do other fermented foods. Lack of vitamin K2 can cause calcium to be deposited in our arteries, aorta, and soft tissues rather than in our bones. Vitamin K2, along with magnesium, is critical for regulating calcium in the body to protect bone health and prevent calcium buildup in the arteries.

    The same way serrapeptase successfully targets excess tissue in the form of fibroids and scar tissue, nattokinase is especially therapeutic when targeting thrombi in the cardiovascular system. Because enzymes are a natural component in a healthy body, there is very little risk or occurrence of toxicity. But make no mistake, they are powerful. Nattokinase, in particular, is so successful at improving blood flow and volume that its use should be carefully considered and monitored if a person is being treated for blood coagulation problems. It should not be used by persons currently taking a prescription blood thinner, unless under the supervision of a healthcare provider.
    Last edited by jtip1810; 08-04-2018 at 09:54 AM.

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    Sorry. Double copy and paste there. You get the point.

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    Where can one aquire these and are they expensive?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Haywire View Post
    Where can one aquire these and are they expensive?
    I order mine off of Amazon. Doctors Best is the name of the company and it's relatively inexpensive. The ones mentioned in this article, I assume are probably expensive but I couldn't tell you why. Just order the Doctors Best.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rreign View Post
    I order mine off of Amazon. Doctors Best is the name of the company and it's relatively inexpensive. The ones mentioned in this article, I assume are probably expensive but I couldn't tell you why. Just order the Doctors Best.
    What do you dose at, just the recommended amount? Got some in my cart for next payday..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Haywire View Post
    What do you dose at, just the recommended amount? Got some in my cart for next payday..
    Yeah the recommended dose is 1 pill a day of each. I can't say I've found a reason to take any more or less

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    Should I discontinue taking a baby aspirin at night once I start taking the nattokinase?

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    Also, do you dose in the am or pm? With or without food?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Haywire View Post
    Also, do you dose in the am or pm? With or without food?
    My supplement regiment is a bit strange for most because I don't really have the proper memory required for multiple dosing. I say it that way because frankly I'm forgetful and my short term memory isn't the greatest thanks to my PTSD.

    All of my supplements are taken in the AM with my breakfast and shakes as quickly as I can after I wake. As for the baby aspirin I would really consider not taking it. If you have some type of heart issues that require you to stay on any type of aspirin regiment then I wouldn't use nattokinase. If you have any questions about your current aspirin regiment I would ask a doctor. Now if you're on the regiment without doctor supervision then you may want seriously research the dangers. Here's a good article https://www.livestrong.com/article/2...f-nattokinase/ that talks specifically about aspirin and other blood thinners with the use of nattokinase. I'm not a doctor and all of this is based on my own use and research of these supplements so please if you have serious concerns, ask your doctor.

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    Naw, no Drs orders to take it. That is, I do have a prolapsed mitrol valve, but it's not serious, I asked my doc if I should take a baby asperin at night and he said it couldn't hurt, but it wasn't absolutely necessary. I will just discontinue the baby asperin since the nattokinase will do what I wanted the baby asperin to do anyway. Thanks for the info

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    Quote Originally Posted by Haywire View Post
    Naw, no Drs orders to take it. That is, I do have a prolapsed mitrol valve, but it's not serious, I asked my doc if I should take a baby asperin at night and he said it couldn't hurt, but it wasn't absolutely necessary. I will just discontinue the baby asperin since the nattokinase will do what I wanted the baby asperin to do anyway. Thanks for the info
    No problem bro. Doctors Best just started offering a mixed blend of Serrapeptase and Nattokinase in one. Doing the math I think it's a cheaper route than buying both of then desperately because they contain the same mg strength but you can just buy 1 bottle

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    Quote Originally Posted by Berserker View Post
    No problem bro. Doctors Best just started offering a mixed blend of Serrapeptase and Nattokinase in one. Doing the math I think it's a cheaper route than buying both of then desperately because they contain the same mg strength but you can just buy 1 bottle
    Interesting, my bottles say to take serrapeptase on an empty stomach, but nattokinase with food. Wonder how that will play out, or if it even matters lol

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